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Latest News Around the Web

Family-Based CBT May Be Key Factor In Treating Kids With ASD Who Have Problems Sleeping, Small Study Indicates.

HCP Live (11/23) reported that “family-based cognitive behavioral therapy [CBT] may be a key factor in treating children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who have problems sleeping.” The findings of the 81-child study were published in the June issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental June issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental.

Related Links:

— “Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Children with Autism and Sleep Disorders, MD Magazine, November 23, 2016.

Shared Environment Of Twins May Increase Risk Of ASD-Related Incidental Brain Findings, Small Scan Study Indicates.

HealthImaging (11/23, Pearson) reported, “The shared environment of twins – possibly in utero as well as in childhood – ups the risk of brain incidental findings associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in both siblings even when only one of them has ASD,” researchers found after comparing magnetic resonance imaging “brain scans of 50 ‘case pairs’ of twin children in whom at least one twin had a diagnosis of ASD with the scans of 32 non-ASD control pairs.” The findingswere published online Nov. 22 in Autism Research.

Related Links:

— “MRI suggested as part of initial autism workup of twins, especially boys,”Dave Pearson, HealthImaging , November 23, 2016.

Cognitive Processing Therapy Administered Individually May Be More Effective Than Group Therapy Among Active-Duty Soldiers Who Develop PTSD Postdeployment, Study Suggests.

Healio (11/23, Oldt) reported, “Cognitive processing therapy administered individually was more effective than therapy administered in a group for PTSD among active-duty service members who developed PTSD postdeployment,” researchers found after conducting “a randomized clinical trial among 268 active-duty service members with PTSD after deployment who achieved stability with medication.” The findings were published online Nov. 23 in JAMA Psychiatry. The author of an accompanying editorial observed the study “also highlights that we have probably come about as far as we can with currently dominant clinical approaches.” For that reason, “other strategies are urgently needed to effectively address remaining research and clinical gaps concerning the health care needs of combat veterans.”

Related Links:

— “Individual cognitive therapy more effective than group therapy for PTSD,”Amanda Oldt, Healio, November 23, 2016.

Dementia Rate In Americans 65 And Older Has Fallen 24% Over 12 Years, Study Reveals

NBC Nightly News (11/21, story 9, 0:25, Holt) reported, “A study from the University of Michigan found the rate of dementia in seniors has dropped by 24 percent since 2000.”

The New York Times (11/22, A13, Kolata, Subscription Publication) reports the study, published online Nov. 21 in JAMA Internal Medicine, reveals that “the dementia rate in Americans 65 and older fell…over 12 years, to 8.8 percent in 2012 from 11.6 percent in 2000.”

The AP (11/21, Tanner) reports, “Older adults with the most schooling had the lowest dementia rates, and the average education level increased during the study years,” researchers found after analyzing “nationally representative government surveys of about 10,500 older adults” in 2000 and in 2012.

According to Kaiser Health News (11/21, Szabo), the authors of accompanying editorial observed that it may be “possible that people with more education can better compensate for memory problems as they age, finding ways to work around their impairments.”

Psychiatric News (11/21) points out the study “authors also noted that while rates of cardiovascular risk factors have gone up since 2000, treatments for cardiovascular disease have improved, which may contribute to the reduced dementia incidence.”

Related Links:

— “U.S. Dementia Rates Are Dropping Even as Population Ages,”Gina Kolata, The New York Times, November 22, 2016.

Foundation News

2013 Outstanding Merit Award Entries Open Now

Nominations are now being accepted for the Foundation’s 2013 Outstanding Merit Award.

The annual Outstanding Merit Award is given for a worthy endeavor in Maryland that accomplishes one or more of the following:

  • Increases public awareness and understanding of mental illness
  • Enhances the quality of care for psychiatric illness
  • Reduces the stigma of mental illness

Nominations for this award of $1000 are being invited from the entire Maryland community. A short nomination form must be submitted with a cover letter by March 1, 2013, to the Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry, 1101 Saint. Paul Street, Suite 305, Baltimore, MD 21202-6405. The form is available as PDF or Word document.

Foundation’s Latest Radio Spot Tells How Common Mental Illness Is

The Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry, Inc.’s latest public service announcement on local Maryland radio stations focuses on how common mental illness really is. It discusses how people avoid thinking about it and urges them to seek help when needed.

You can listen to the ad using the player in the upper right of the website’s homepage. All past public service spots are also available for listening or to download on our Radio Advertisements page.

Foundation’s Latest Radio Spot Examines Alcohol and Sports

The Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry, Inc. recently began airing a new public service announcement on local Maryland radio stations. It focuses on the role alcohol can play as the fall sports season begins.

You can listen to the ad using the player in the upper right of the website’s homepage. All past public service spots are also available for listening or to download on our Radio Advertisements page.

Depressed Adolescents Often Struggle Alone

The Los Angeles Times (4/29, Healy) “Booster Shots” blog reported that although “some 2-million Americans adolescents experienced a bout of major depression last year,” only about one-third of them received help, according to a report released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to “kick off a month of national activity aimed at raising awareness of childrens’ mental health.”

Overall, about “8.1% of the population between 12 and 17 years old reported experiencing a period of depressed mood lasting two or more weeks in the preceding 12 months.” Depressive episodes increased with age; and adolescent boys were “consistently less likely to report depression.” Nearly 15 percent of “girls 15 to 17 years old” described a “major depressive episode in the preceding year, compared to an average of 6.4% of boys” of the same age “who did so.”

Related Links:

– “Depressed teens mostly struggle alone,” Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, April 29, 2011.

John Plaskon Wins 2011 Outstanding Merit Award

At the MPS annual meeting in April, the Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry presented its 2011 Outstanding Merit Award to John Plaskon, executive director of Crossroads Community, Inc. in Centreville, for his vision and leadership in opening a new mental health clinic in rural Queen Anne’s County during the height of the recession.

The Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry established the annual Outstanding Merit Award for a worthy program in Maryland that accomplishes one or more of the following:

  • Increases public awareness and understanding of mental illness
  • Enhances the quality of care for psychiatric illness
  • Reduces the stigma of mental illness

The award, open to the entire Maryland community, carries a prize of $500. Find information on nominating for the 2012 award here.