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Latest News Around the Web

Babies Born At An Extremely Low Birth Weight May Increase Risk of Mental Health Issues As An Adult

HealthDay (10/5, Mozes) reports, “Being born at an extremely low birth weight,” that is, at 2.2 pounds or less, “seems to increase the risk for developing mental health issues as an adult,” but such “risk can be lowered by lessening exposure to bullying and family stress during childhood and adolescence,” researchers found after reviewing “40 years’ worth of data” on “nearly 180 extremely low birth weight children who had been born between 1977 and 1982 and survived into adulthood,” then comparing “their adult mental health status…with that of 145 adults who had been born at a normal weight.” The findings were published online Oct. 3 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Related Links:

— “Protecting Preemies From Stress Might Improve Later Mental Health,” Alan Mozes, HealthDay, October 5, 2017.

Maternal Multivitamin Supplementation During Pregnancy May Reduce Autism Risk of Child

HealthDay (10/5, Reinberg) reports, “Taking a multivitamin during pregnancy may reduce a child’s risk of developing autism,” research indicated. After analyzing data on “more than a quarter-million mother-child pairs in Sweden,” investigators found that “multivitamin use with or without added iron or folic acid was associated with a lower likelihood of child autism with intellectual disability, compared with mothers who did not use supplements.” The findingswere published online Oct. 4 in the BMJ. Healio (10/5, Oldt) also covers the study.

Related Links:

— “Prenatal Multivitamins Linked to Lower Autism Risk,” Steven Reinberg, HealthDay, October 5, 2017.

Families’ Ability To Care For Alzheimer’s Patients Is Declining

USA Today (10/3, Weintraub) reports that according to a new report to be released today by the advocacy group UsAgainstAlzheimer, American families are decreasingly able to provide care for loved ones with Alzheimer’s. American families have fewer financial resources and “Medicare and Medicaid are simply not prepared to cope with the growing numbers of people with this disease,” according to UsAgainstAlzheimer chairman George Vradenburg. While “fewer 75-year-olds are getting the disease, … more people are living to 85, and roughly half of them will develop Alzheimer’s, statistics show.”

Related Links:

— “Caregiving for Alzheimer’s patients at risk in coming years, report says,” Karen Weintraub, USA Today, October 3, 2017.

PTSD Particularly Common Among People Exposed To Mass Shootings

The AP (10/3, Tanner) reports that people who survived this week’s shootings in Las Vegas may be at risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Also at risk for “psychological fallout” are first responders, medical staff, eyewitnesses, and bystanders. Studies indicate “PTSD is particularly common among people exposed to mass shootings versus other types of trauma, with rates as high as 90 percent reported” by some researchers.

Related Links:

— “Concert shooting puts many at risk for post-traumatic stress,” Associated Press, October 4, 2017.

Financial Costs of Frontotemporal Degeneration Nearly Twice As High As Costs With Alzheimer’s

Medscape (10/4, Harrison) reports that research indicates “the financial costs associated with frontotemporal degeneration (FTD), the most common dementia in patients under age 60 years, are nearly twice as high as those associated with Alzheimer’s disease.” Data “from the web-based survey show the total annual per-patient cost of caring for a patient with FTD was $119,654 in 2016 US dollars,” approximately “two times higher than reported costs of taking care of a patient with AD.” The survey indicated “the median annual household income” one year “before an FTD diagnosis was in the range of $75,000 to $99,000. But 12 months after diagnosis it fell to the $50,000 to $59,000 range – a drop of up to 50%.” The findings were published online Oct. 4 in Neurology.

Related Links:

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Foundation News

MFP Radio Ad Examines Mental Illness and Violence

The Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry, Inc.’s latest public service announcement on local Maryland radio stations focuses on the real statistics concerning mental illness and violence. It discusses the problem of cuts in mental illness coverage by insurance companies and less focus by government.

You can listen to the ad using the player in the upper right of the website’s homepage. All past public service spots are also available for listening or to download on our Radio Advertisements page.

2013 Outstanding Merit Award Entries Open Now

Nominations are now being accepted for the Foundation’s 2013 Outstanding Merit Award.

The annual Outstanding Merit Award is given for a worthy endeavor in Maryland that accomplishes one or more of the following:

  • Increases public awareness and understanding of mental illness
  • Enhances the quality of care for psychiatric illness
  • Reduces the stigma of mental illness

Nominations for this award of $1000 are being invited from the entire Maryland community. A short nomination form must be submitted with a cover letter by March 1, 2013, to the Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry, 1101 Saint. Paul Street, Suite 305, Baltimore, MD 21202-6405. The form is available as PDF or Word document.

Foundation’s Latest Radio Spot Tells How Common Mental Illness Is

The Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry, Inc.’s latest public service announcement on local Maryland radio stations focuses on how common mental illness really is. It discusses how people avoid thinking about it and urges them to seek help when needed.

You can listen to the ad using the player in the upper right of the website’s homepage. All past public service spots are also available for listening or to download on our Radio Advertisements page.

Foundation’s Latest Radio Spot Examines Alcohol and Sports

The Maryland Foundation for Psychiatry, Inc. recently began airing a new public service announcement on local Maryland radio stations. It focuses on the role alcohol can play as the fall sports season begins.

You can listen to the ad using the player in the upper right of the website’s homepage. All past public service spots are also available for listening or to download on our Radio Advertisements page.

Depressed Adolescents Often Struggle Alone

The Los Angeles Times (4/29, Healy) “Booster Shots” blog reported that although “some 2-million Americans adolescents experienced a bout of major depression last year,” only about one-third of them received help, according to a report released by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to “kick off a month of national activity aimed at raising awareness of childrens’ mental health.”

Overall, about “8.1% of the population between 12 and 17 years old reported experiencing a period of depressed mood lasting two or more weeks in the preceding 12 months.” Depressive episodes increased with age; and adolescent boys were “consistently less likely to report depression.” Nearly 15 percent of “girls 15 to 17 years old” described a “major depressive episode in the preceding year, compared to an average of 6.4% of boys” of the same age “who did so.”

Related Links:

– “Depressed teens mostly struggle alone,” Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, April 29, 2011.